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Newly Listed

Newly Listed

 
  • Advisor Sparse Tiger Shorts "Gold". These are a fun twist. They are the classic "advisor" pattern and are the "Anglo" cut with US Sizes. True to originals, they are just like trousers, except they are hemmed shorted into shorts. These have incredible detail including color, medium to heavy twill fabric, dish buttons, green thread, and simple ink stamp for size in garment. These are great for a party suit / base camp impression throughout the war or for everyday casual wear at home! Trousers feature two rear bellows pockets and two thigh bellows pockets with double buttons. They are missing the small single button "cigarette" pocket on the lower left leg as they are shorts vs pants. Shorts feature a Hama zipper, two slash pockets, two double button cargo pockets with bellows facing in, two rear double button pockets (ZIP-7P1 style). Sizing Note: Please note that the measurements given are the actual measurements for the waist. There is no vanity sizing. If you wear a 34 in jeans, they may actually measure a 36 so please be sure that you know your actual waist size when ordering. *Accepting orders now, shorts should be instock and shipping the first full week of July Learn More

    Advisor Sparse Tiger Stripe Shorts (Gold)

    $60.00
  • Tadpole Sparse Tiger Shorts. These are a fun twist. They are the classic "advisor" pattern and are the "Anglo" cut with US Sizes. True to originals, they are just like trousers, except they are hemmed shorted into shorts. These have incredible detail including color, medium to heavy twill fabric, dish buttons, green thread, and simple ink stamp for size in garment. There is photo evidence of Tadpole Sparse being used in Vietnam as early as 1964, so you can use these for a party suit / base camp impression throughout the war or everyday casual wear. Shorts feature two rear bellows pockets and two thigh bellows pockets with double buttons. They are missing the small single button "cigarette" pocket on the lower left leg as they are shorts vs pants. They have a five button fly closure and take up tabs at the waist. Green thread construction (BUT-7P1 style). Sizing Note: Please note that the measurements given are the actual measurements for the waist. There is no vanity sizing. If you wear a 34 in jeans, they may actually measure a 36 so please be sure that you know your actual waist size when ordering. Learn More

    Tadpole Sparse Tiger Stripe Shorts

    $60.00
  • Utility Cover, Mitchell Pattern. This is a great reproduction of the USN / USMC style utility covers in Mitchell Pattern Camo. . These are made from the same material as helmet covers and have features consistent with period production such as single front panel stitching, reinforced front panel, vents, etc. These have a heavy weight and feel and hold shape nicely. These covers were popular in-country items during the war. We can add an iron-on EGA to the cover before shipping for $10.00 Learn More

    Utility Cover, Mitchell Pattern

    $40.00
  • ERDL Camo Boonie, Rip-Stop, Reproduction. These are outstanding boonies that match our ripstop ERDL jungle fatigues. Correct details throughout including square chin cord keeper, small screened eyelets, HBT nylon band, brim stitching, labels, etc. They look incredible! Learn More

    ERDL Boonie, R/S

    $40.00
  • Air Assault Badge, 1st Pattern, Color. We have finally reproduced this hard to find patch. With the activation of the 11th Air Assault Division (Test) on 15 February 1963 at Fort Benning, Georgia, the division commander, then Brigadier General Harry W. O. Kinnard, began to fashion an operational reality from a vision – what later came to be called “airmobility”. Part of this mission was to create a ‘state of mind’ among the members of the division – “sky soldiers” as they were called – to instill in them belief in the new airmobile concept. Airmobility had to do more than merely provide Infantry troops with helicopters for rides – it needed to train all ground elements in conjunction with all air elements to create a well-honed combat fighting team. To differentiate 11th Air Assault Division “sky soldiers” from other Army units, General Kinnard had designed and established a ‘special’ badge’ that his “sky soldiers” could wear as a mark of their airmobility expertise. This became the 11th Air Assault Division (Test) “Air Assault Badge”, first issued in the spring of 1964. It was never officially recognized by the Army, and Kinnard stated "I wear my original Air Assault Badge proudly, as may anyone in the first shift of the Jumping Mustangs and as far as the rest of you, I personally authorize it. I doubt if anyone will question you." In order to qualify for this badge, each soldier had to successfully rappel from a helicopter, thrice from 60 feet and twice from 120 feet. Each soldier had to pass aircraft safety procedures, an aircraft orientation, arm and hand signals, combat assault operations, prepare, inspect and rig equipment for a sling load, and be able to lash down equipment carried in cargo helicopters. Despite the 11th Air Assault (Test) being rolled into the 1st Cavalry Division, the "Original" Air Assault Badge was an item of pride and you see it in use throughout the 60's in both US and in-country made styles in color and subdued. Originals are very hard to find and coveted by their owners. Learn More

    Air Assault Badge, 1st Pattern, Color

    $10.00
  • Air Assault Badge, 1st Pattern, Subdued. We have finally reproduced this hard to find patch. With the activation of the 11th Air Assault Division (Test) on 15 February 1963 at Fort Benning, Georgia, the division commander, then Brigadier General Harry W. O. Kinnard, began to fashion an operational reality from a vision – what later came to be called “airmobility”. Part of this mission was to create a ‘state of mind’ among the members of the division – “sky soldiers” as they were called – to instill in them belief in the new airmobile concept. Airmobility had to do more than merely provide Infantry troops with helicopters for rides – it needed to train all ground elements in conjunction with all air elements to create a well-honed combat fighting team. To differentiate 11th Air Assault Division “sky soldiers” from other Army units, General Kinnard had designed and established a ‘special’ badge’ that his “sky soldiers” could wear as a mark of their airmobility expertise. This became the 11th Air Assault Division (Test) “Air Assault Badge”, first issued in the spring of 1964. It was never officially recognized by the Army, and Kinnard stated "I wear my original Air Assault Badge proudly, as may anyone in the first shift of the Jumping Mustangs and as far as the rest of you, I personally authorize it. I doubt if anyone will question you." In order to qualify for this badge, each soldier had to successfully rappel from a helicopter, thrice from 60 feet and twice from 120 feet. Each soldier had to pass aircraft safety procedures, an aircraft orientation, arm and hand signals, combat assault operations, prepare, inspect and rig equipment for a sling load, and be able to lash down equipment carried in cargo helicopters. Despite the 11th Air Assault (Test) being rolled into the 1st Cavalry Division, the "Original" Air Assault Badge was an item of pride and you see it in use throughout the 60's in both US and in-country made styles in color and subdued. Originals are very hard to find and coveted by their owners. Learn More

    Air Assault Badge, 1st Pattern, Subd

    $10.00